For The Record

Every so often, I have to contend with why I write certain themes. Grief, taboo, hatred, awkwardness, or even violation. Most of the time, my brain will make me contend with them, but sometimes, an outside source will do it for me.

This past week, I got a comment on Being More Social that, while flattering towards the story in certain parts, got pretty scathing about a certain aspect: the age of the characters. It asked why I would bother writing full sex scenes with these participants, and then softly accused myself and those who read them of committing crimes. For that reason, I didn’t allow the comment to be posted. Attacks on my character, which were certainly in there, are fine. Post about how much I suck all you want. Bring criminal allegations into them and your comment is out.

At the same time, there’s a possibility the commenter is reading this very blog post and I want to give them a good-faith response. If you are reading this, hi. The sole reason your comment was never published was, again, the accusing of crimes part. I would enjoy having a discussion with you, and hope this blog proves it.

This person mentioned, fairly, that they can’t imagine a reason why anyone would want to write such descriptive sex scenes of such participants except for getting off to it, which, according to them, would make such a writer or reader a word that rhymes with schmedophile. Less fair. Hopefully my response isn’t too long and ramble-y.

Being More Social, at its core, represents two things. Number one, the fact that I myself was thrust into a sex life early on in high school, as likely are a fair number of my readers. Perhaps some wish they had. This led to a lot of consequences, scares, and ruined relationships. I have a very love-hate relationship with my own past. On the one hand, it’s nice to look back and romanticize about the days of yore. On the other, jumping headfirst into a sex life when you’re a teen sucks and leads to bad things, and Being More Social is, at its core, a cautionary tale. Adam goes into the story having a crush on May. It’s cutesy until sex gets involved, and then everything unravels until sex is used like a weapon both by and against him. May has to leave the school because of the way she feels vilified, which for those who missed it, is the exact reason Adam is at this school instead of the school he’s supposed to be in at the beginning of the story. Being More Social is a story about how sex, which seems great, will lead to bad things without communication, trust, patience, and consent.

This leads to two conclusions. A, I write these stories to reminisce about high school. Not to say I as an adult wish I was having sex with people still in high school. To make that leap in logic, I’d argue, is to look for a way to paint me in this light in bad faith. Peddophilia (misspelling intentional) in the story is treated as one of the two horrific conclusions of Megan’s journey, and is played for horror, not lust. B, if you say “you liked the plot” but don’t get why I made the sex scenes dry and unspecial in a story told from a first-person perspective about teenage hormones, you didn’t truly get the plot. If I skipped the sex scenes or made them a sentence long and still included the horror and consequences, this story would have looked more like an abstinence PSA. In order to make this story, I needed the agony and the ecstasy. The fact the ecstasy was taboo was part of the point, and the story wouldn’t have worked at all if the ecstasy was implied.

TL;DR – I wrote sex scenes between high schoolers to make people look at their own past with arousal, not to look at the people with arousal. I craft these stories very carefully around that distinction. Teenagers read these stories too, and I want to very specifically warn them not to do what the characters get up to in my stories. And speaking of…

Number two, the second thing Being More Social represents, is a light in the dark, if you will. Do you know how many stories online there are of people in high school getting it on, often with adults, where the tone is entirely consequence-free? Almost every reader here has come from a mainstream erotica site. they can vouch that, possibly as kids, they’re seen these stories before.

When I was in junior high, I used to read those stories, and do you know what else I did? I took notes, and tried emulating those stories to get girls I had crushes on, because I was a stupid awkward teen. I have, and will continue to, write my stories keeping in mind that if Teenage Me had read any of my stories, I wouldn’t want to give him any false impressions.

You may see what I’m doing as “sexualizing kids.” If so, I have no clue how you found me. My origins were from sites that legitimately sexualized kids, and I have fought to bring the reality of their awkwardness and consequences back to them. An easy sweep of a site like sexstories or storiesonline can find you a story where either two people under eighteen get it on, or a teenager with an adult. Even sites with stricter guidelines like Literotica have stories where ages were obviously switched at the last second, often so comically so that the story doesn’t make consistent sense.

Perhaps you’re aware of this and thought of me as an exception. You thought I wouldn’t “stoop so low.” I don’t see what I’m doing as stooping. Again, people under 18 read this, that’s just a reality. They don’t associate with me or comment on this site, and if they do I never want them to and they should stop. But as long as that reality exists, pretending it doesn’t helps real-world child molesters. I would rather help make hormonal teens aware of the consequences of their actions and what complicated matters like consent mean. I would also rather show teens as awkward, over-emotional and overall unsexy to anyone but other teens, especially confused adults who wrongly think things about teenagers.

Again, the theme of teenagers having sex is rampant in the free online erotica world. Rampant. If I stop with that subject to adjust to a reader’s personal taste, will it slow the flow of this kind of content wholecloth? Not at all. Not a difference. Taking a drop out of the ocean. But if I write it in such a way where a teen reads it and becomes aware that, just like one of my characters, they’re being pressured into sex and need to say no to their partner, is that worth the uncomfortable age premise? To me, yes.

The commenter also asked why I wrote the sex scenes of, ultimately, the assault on Molly, like a normal sexy sex scene. This was a little more understandable and I hope the answer is as understandable in turn.

At the time of writing that story (early 2016), the site I was writing for had experienced a large number of “fucking a girl for the first time in her sleep until she wakes up and moans for the man to keep going” stories. It was trivializing rape, and had I read it in junior high I could have been horribly influenced. I was appalled. I wanted to do something. And so, I decided to do a rugpull. I wrote the sex scene deliberately sexily so that any reader who didn’t see what Aaron was doing as filthy would nod along, and then I showed the heartbreak, betrayal, and fear in Molly’s voice when Aaron told her.

Aaron, like a potential viewer, was holding onto this “maybe she enjoyed it” thought, which is a common thought for rapists and would-be rapists alike. I wanted the reality to set in for some readers that they had sided with a rapist and needed to do better. Quoting the book directly,

“You played with her. You didn’t even like her, you liked owning her. Fuck you.” He paced around the room again. “I shouldn’t need to tell you how much of an awful person you are for trying to rape your own childhood friend. If you even saw what you were doing from the outside, would you support that, would you beat off to that, you fucking sicko? Or would you actually care about a human being’s feelings? Suppose I was doing this to her. Would you try to stop me?”

I wasn’t subtle.

It’s understandable to look at themes like rape and peddophilia (misspelling intentional) as inherently unwriteable. I may never see this reader again. I will also say that I do not write this stuff for fetish material, and I likely will never touch peddophilia in any form ever again after Teacher’s Threat said all I needed to say. Maybe I will, maybe I won’t. I’ll almost certainly never write a story like The Good The Bad and The Molly again. I will almost definitely write stories featuring people in high school again, and I will do it with a clear conscience. It’s how I enjoy my youth, and I write it to enjoy the feeling of being a teen myself, not pursuing them in my current-day body.

Like, that’s such a comically huge shift in a story’s feeling that I’m baffled this was the conclusion, just because it featured high schoolers. On a personal front I actually kind of find it insulting to say you liked the plot but don’t get why I wrote sex scenes that way. What did you like about the plot? Did you feel that I could have written the exact same story of Being More Social about 30-somethings in an office job? Did you miss the parts about consent? Did you not care? Why am I writing stories about minors with such attempted care and morals if people are going to go up into their ivory towers and accuse me of being the exact type of person I attempt to warn teenagers about? Why am I writing stories about assault and all but calling out the reader by name for enjoying it if some people are going to skip that part then just claim I trivialized rape?

Sigh.

I am a high emotions person and I’m lashing out because of the work I put in. This commenter clearly has a good heart, was sheltered through high school and assumes every good person is as sheltered as them (insulting but naïve, not malicious) and just wants what’s right to them. In my opinion, in their quest for justice, they missed a lot, but there’s an argument to be made there too. Almost no one is going to pick up on every nuance I make, almost definitely due to my own errors in telling the story. (Though I still maintain, that part I quoted from GBM is overt and in-your-face.) Someone is always going to misinterpret something, and credit where it’s due, this is the first time I’ve ever gotten a comment accusing me of being a child ******er.

My current job, although as a temporary position, involves me protecting children. It’s fun to poke fun at me for getting the pacing wrong in a story or something, but I will not tolerate people undermining very important messages that some people like to ignore. People like to pretend teens never hear about sex until they’re 18, then act surprised when their district has some of the highest teen pregnancy rates in the state. These people are idiots.

Is it silly to place my stories in context to such a huge and important thing? Honestly, I would argue no. I’m starting a difficult conversation about teens though an unsuspecting medium that most educators, let alone sex writers, want to avoid, all while trying to keep the guise of a teen sex story there, so that us older people can relive our youths with fond nostalgia. If someone turns to kid diddling from one of my stories, they would have done it just as easily from virtually any depiction of a teenage boy or girl ever. I just have the guts to look that kind of concept in the face and not hold back with my depictions, both the good and the bad.

Puritans and abstinence-advocators use the withholding of knowledge to stay in positions of power, often over children. If the kids don’t know sex, they don’t know what’s coming. If they don’t know consent, they don’t know to say no and when to say it. The lack of education and acceptance is exactly how peddophiles work. They don’t work through accurate information, they work through confusion and manipulation. They work in the dark and rely on childrens’ lack of experience and knowledge. And we say to write about teenage sex accurately and unboringly is to help peddophiles? Fuck that. It’s just untrue. Of course, if you’re diddling kids I and my work hates you and always have. By the same token, if you accuse my work of supporting such a horrible practice and accuse me of that crime, you’re just not aware.

More writing will be out soon. I’ll talk to you all next week.

9 thoughts on “For The Record

  1. Hi Bashful,

    First of all, I want you to know that I’m not as good with words as you are. Not because I’m too young (I’m 23), but because English is not my first language. I hope I can make myself clear. This is my response to your blog.

    “The sole reason your comment was never published was, again, the accusing of crimes part.” > Fair enough. It’s your website, your decision what you do with the comments. However, I never accused you of “such crimes”. I wondered if you (and your readers, I did call them p3d0s yes) write sex scenes because you get off to it. Getting off to stories about teenagers having sex is SADLY not a crime.

    “Being More Social is a story about how sex, which seems great, will lead to bad things without communication, trust, patience, and consent.” > You can still write about the consequences of sex and the things that caused it without writing such descriptive sex scenes, as thousands of other authors successfully do. I’ll quote one of your scenes (from chapter 4): “Outstretching my tongue, I started to trace letters right above her clit, just outside her lips, anywhere that could make her crazy with anticipation. A good five minutes of this passed, and by the end she was breathing furiously, squirming and pleading for me to dive in.” > So what did we learn from this besides Adam being capable of tracing letters with his tongue? The only thing I learned from this scene that was important to the plot or important information about the character was: Adam sexualizing his crush May. You could have skipped all the sex stuff and started the scene here: “After, we lay in the bed, completely naked, completely wordless, connected by our hips, shoulder and hands, which were held in a clasp as we both looked up at the ceiling.” > It’s clear that they have had sex (without the descriptive porn-like sex scene) and you could have made Adam admit in an internal monologue that he thought of May during the sex. Period. It’s that easy.

    “This leads to two conclusions. A, I write these stories to reminisce about high school.” > which is cool. Still not a reason to write such descriptive sex scenes.

    “Not to say I as an adult wish I was having sex with people still in high school. To make that leap in logic, I’d argue, is to look for a way to paint me in this light in bad faith.” > I never said I think that you as an adult wish to have sex with teenagers. I wondered if you get off to it (teenagers having sex since that’s what’s in your story, not you having sex with them).

    “Peddophilia (misspelling intentional) in the story is treated as one of the two horrific conclusions of Megan’s journey, and is played for horror, not lust.” > never was this word used in the story or was the conclusion very clear. Nothing really happened after Megan and that teacher got caught. Adam acknowledged that the teacher took advantage of a kid, but victimblamed Megan and assumed she initiated it and decided not to report the teacher for selfish reasons. The conclusion should have been the teacher committed a crime and got away with it because Adam was too pussy to report him and Megan was violated. But of course this is written from Adam’s POV, so I understand that’s not his conclusion. Which is fair enough, but then don’t talk about “horrific conclusions” being treated in your story because it wasn’t treated at all. It was just described and then you showed us how Adam thinks about the situation.

    “if you say “you liked the plot” but don’t get why I made the sex scenes dry and unspecial in a story told from a first-person perspective about teenage hormones, you didn’t truly get the plot. > I don’t have to read paraghraps full of descriptions of Nicole and May’s pussy to “get the plot”. In fact I didn’t read the sex scenes (I scanned them quickly to see if anything important was mentioned) and skipped all of them and still got the plot. I’m sorry but your discrediting yourself here. There’s more to your story than the sex scenes and it’s not true that the descriptive sex is crucial tot he plot.

    “If I skipped the sex scenes or made them a sentence long and still included the horror and consequences, this story would have looked more like an abstinence PSA.” > You’re still discrediting yourself and I wish you would see that your story is still worth it without the sex scenes. Plus it’s not impossible. There are thousands of YA authors who successfully treat the same subjects without writing descriptive sex scenes.

    “In order to make this story, I needed the agony and the ecstasy.” > which you can still describe after or before the fact.

    “I wrote sex scenes between high schoolers to make people look at their own past with arousal, not to look at the people with arousal.” > I guess I’m not among those people since I didn’t have a sex life in high school. I hope you realize that you don’t write for everyone. There’s nothing universal about the experiences in your stories, experiences of young teenage boys in a North American high school with sex. I, as a young Greek-Japanese woman who grew up in a small town led by conservative christians in the Netherlands, could not relate at all. There was maybe one character I could at least understand and that was Matt since I also went to the same high school with my little sister and saw her being violated and tried to protect her and didn’t have the best approach to it because I was a kid myself and I was parentified my whole life because my parents were emotionally absent. But other than that, I can’t relate to your characters. Which is fine, I don’t have to and there’s nothing wrong if you want to write for a specific target group who did experience high school like that. I just want you to know that it’s not universal (referrng to your other blog post). Kids all over the world grow up differently. Some grow up in war and don’t get to be a kid. Some grow up in poverty like me who don’t get to be a kid. Some grow up without parents. There’s more in the minds of kids than just sex and romance. Thinking that teenage kids are hormone laden and think a lot about sex is very American and very western-centered.

    “You may see what I’m doing as “sexualizing kids.” If so, I have no clue how you found me.” > your story, the good the bad and the molly was recommended to me by a friend. She reads erotica and spends time on websites like sexstories. She sent me a link and said I was going to like it. I hate erotica, but she said that I was going to like this “angst filled (romance) drama with heavy subjects”. I liked the story and decided to try another one, Mutual Benefits. Here are a few things I liked about that story which kept me reading more of your stories:
    – Students study. They actually open their books and do math. Half of your damn life in high school is studying and figure out how to study. The other half is to navigate the social climate at your school. I was the typical depressed kid in school. I studied constantly, it’s how I coped. In most stories and movies about high school, you don’t really see this part, just the drama. Or the story is fantastical, dystopian or speculative.The reason is well writing about studying is boring. People don’t want to read about kids trying to get into college (who does?). I think you write stories about high school in a way that doesn’t sound like hell on earth full of jocks with nerds getting pummeled on the sidelines.
    – Teenagers are being capable of being serious and they are capable of doing that without being depressed or angsty all the time. I think you did this very well.
    – You ignored the stereotypes like jocks vs nerds. You showed that the popular crowd studies as well.
    – Teenagers are not idiots. Sure they can do something irresponsible, but there’s always a motivation behind it. It could be just to let go and have fun. It could be because they were misinformed or misled. But a teenager can have good insight and wisdom. I liked how you always show the intent or motivation behind everyone’s action without justifiying it. Sometimes the character justifies it, but it’s often clear that it’s the opinions of that character.
    – I also liked the parents, the parents with good intentions that make mistakes because of ignorance like Nicole’s. The emotionally absent parents. That was very realistic.

    But teenagers are also not sex crazed animals. Teenagers do have some semblance of self control, which you showed sometimes like with Nicole (even though she caved in the end) and Quinn. Blowjobs in the classroom and sex in the janitor’s closet? I mean come on. I didn’t grow up in America, but even I know that is not what happens in real life.

    “I would rather help make hormonal teens aware of the consequences of their actions and what complicated matters like consent mean.” > Again, you can still do that without describing how cute Megan’s “little ass” looks like.

    “Perhaps you’re aware of this and thought of me as an exception. You thought I wouldn’t “stoop so low.” I don’t see what I’m doing as stooping.” > Yes, that’s what I thought and still think, even after your blog post. Growing up as a teen seeing kids having sex on tv, reading about it it made me so fucking sick and tired, especially when the creator had reasons like “that’s my writing style, that’s crucial to the story, without it there’s no plot blah blah blah”. At first I thought this is the only way until I started watching more Eastern shows where they don’t show sex at all, but still discuss the same heavy subjects. I thought oh so it is possible. So no, I still see descriptive sex scenes of teenage kids as wrong and see you as “stooping”. But this is just the opinion of one reader.

    “I would also rather show teens as awkward, over-emotional and overall unsexy to anyone but other teens, especially confused adults who wrongly think things about teenagers.” > you don’t show teens as unsexy. I don’t want to quote your scenes anymore, because they disgust me, but you try to make them look sexy by describing their bodies, the porn-like language and adult like dynamics (sub/dom), like who the fuck is 13 and calls another kid her “Master”?

    “If I stop with that subject to adjust to a reader’s personal taste,” > I never said stop with the subject. Just don’t write is in such a descriptive porn way. Not because it’s my personal taste, but because it’s the right thing to do.

    “will it slow the flow of this kind of content wholecloth? Not at all. Not a difference. Taking a drop out of the ocean.” > “i won’t stop doing this bad thing because other people do them too and it won’t make a difference”. uh okay.

    “But if I write it in such a way where a teen reads it and becomes aware that, just like one of my characters, they’re being pressured into sex and need to say no to their partner, is that worth the uncomfortable age premise? To me, yes.” > I see this as justifying something bad with “well it COULD help SOMEONE”. In all that flow of bad content you talked about? Not a difference. Taking a drop out of the ocean. I’m not buying it. I can’t tell if you’re really that unaware and don’t see that writing porn scenes in the classroom and janitor’s closet about teenage kids is wrong or you know it’s wrong and this is your way of manipulating your way out of it. I don’t know you personally so I can’t tell, but I don’t buy this take.

    “At the time of writing that story (early 2016), the site I was writing for had experienced a large number of “fucking a girl for the first time in her sleep until she wakes up and moans for the man to keep going” stories. It was trivializing rape, and had I read it in junior high I could have been horribly influenced. I was appalled. I wanted to do something.” > And make a difference? I thought it was just a drop in the ocean.

    “I wrote the sex scene deliberately sexily so that any reader who didn’t see what Aaron was doing as filthy would nod along, and then I showed the heartbreak, betrayal, and fear in Molly’s voice when Aaron told her.” > You think that someone who nods along rape, would care about the victim’s feelings later?

    “Aaron, like a potential viewer, was holding onto this “maybe she enjoyed it” thought, which is a common thought for rapists and would-be rapists alike” > you don’t know shit about rapists. Rapists don’t care about “if she enjoyed it or not”. They don’t care about anyone, but themselves. “She (could have) enjoyed it” is usually an argument AFTER the fact. Not because they genuinely believe that, but because it’s their way of trying to get away from the situation.

    “I will also say that I do not write this stuff for fetish material” > parts of your stuff is fetish material for some people, whether you like it or not and whether it was your intention or not.

    “Did you feel that I could have written the exact same story about 30-somethings in an office job?” > Yeah, easily. Sex without communication, trust, patience, and consent happens to 30-somethings in office jobs too. And college students. And 50 year olds. High school kids are not the only “clueless” demographic. Most people are.

    “Why am I writing stories about minors with such attempted care and morals if people are going to go up into their ivory towers and accuse me of being the exact type of person I attempt to warn teenagers about? ” > Maybe you need to get out of your own tower and see that you’re not doing a great job at treating stories about minors with care and morals. Just because other readers never commented this, doesn’t mean you’re doing nothing wrong. Maybe your readers have the exact same view as you do and that’s the reason why they keep reading your stories, because they think there’s nothing wrong with it. Maybe you never got a comment like this before, because I’m not your typical reader and you have a typical reader, people who spend time on websites like sexstories. Publish your story on other (non erotic) reading communities like Wattpad and Inkitt where the demographic is young girls and women and you’d get the exact same comment. 3000 times more.

    I want to tell you how trigged I was by parts of your stories and how it made me feel bad. So bad I had to skip a lot of the scenes. My conclusion was this: even though your stories have a great plotline, it’s not worth reading it if I have to skip so much and feel bad afterwards. Maybe it’s because I’m a woman and all of your stories (the longer ones) are written from a male perspective. So yea, it didn’t do me good reading how yet another man/boy decides to not report a rapist and blames the victim and yells in her face.

    “this is the first time I’ve ever gotten a comment accusing me of being a child ******er.” > never said that

    “My current job, although as a temporary position, involves me protecting children.” > so? you can’t do wrong? a lot of children get violated in a setting like that where the adult had to “protect the children”. I’m not saying you violate children, I’m saying it doesn’t mean shit so you don’t have to throw out irrelevant information to make your point.

    “It’s fun to poke fun at me for getting the pacing wrong in a story or something, but I will not tolerate people undermining very important messages that some people like to ignore.” > again, it was not about the messages. it’s about what you use to get the message across, like descripte sex scenes.

    “People like to pretend teens never hear about sex until they’re 18, then act surprised when their district has some of the highest teen pregnancy rates in the state.” > then write about that consequence, not how her pussy is shaven, her lips look fluffy or her eyes look innocent when she swallows cum.

    “And we say to write about teenage sex accurately and unboringly is to help peddophiles? Fuck that.” > Wow, I’m baffled with this one. You have no idea how peddophiles are being helped. I promise you it takes less than writing a descriptive sex scene about teenage kids. Go to tiktok and find an account of a mom that posts an innocent video of her kid and scroll through the comments. I promise you it takes almost nothing to entertain peddos. Whether it was your intention or not, parts of your stuff is fetish material for bad people and that’s reason enough to stop doing it. I’m not saying never talk about subjects like sex and the consequences of it. In fact I think people should talk more about the consequences. But you don’t have to do it in the way you did.

    To finish my comment, I want to wish you good luck with your stories. I won’t visit this website ever again, so I don’t know if you’ll respond to this or not. If you decide to respond to it, I hope you publish my comment because I think it’s fair to show both sides of a view.

    Aya Konstantina Hamazaki

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    1. You make some interesting points, but I think you’ve made some assumptions I disagree with. Firstly – you’re not the only person to skip over the sex scenes. Sometimes I’m just not in the mood to read even the slightest of sexual scenarios, but I still think the sex scenes, even the ones you quoted, are important to understand the character’s perspective and journey of discovery.

      Secondly, this is a pretty realistic depiction of high school for me. As a teenager, I cannot emphasise enough just how horny I was all of the time. And as we couldn’t have sex at home with parents around, it was commonplace to have sex absolutely anywhere. Janitors closets, classrooms, anywhere outside with minimal foot traffic. The most unrealistic thing about the story, to me, was Nicole’s parents. I had this childhood experience in the UK, which I’d describe as much closer in culture to other European countries and not the US/Canada. It isn’t just an American thing.

      Although I completely disagree with your comments about sexualising children (and I do take issue with being called a ped0), what I want to say most is that I understand your point that Being More Social could be redone with less erotica. It is a fantastic story that would keep a reader’s interest without vivid sex scenes. BUT the sex often adds to the story. Even when it doesn’t and it’s there purely to get people off, that’s how Bashful makes his money and is able to be successful with the format of a chapter a month. Being paid to be a fiction writer is one of the most difficult career paths someone could take.

      Anyway, TLDR, you don’t need to read the sex scenes and the people that do aren’t ped0s. Just like people that play violent video games don’t want to shoot people.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. The story is also told from the *perspective* of a fifteen-year-old. It’s all well and good to say in a vacuum that I could have done the exact same story without being so vivid and sexual with the descriptions but I don’t think that’s being honest. I couldn’t have correctly shown the hormones of the story without it. It would have been a bad all-tell-no-show-fest.

        I guess the writers of Euphoria have to deal with being called peddophiles from time to time.

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    2. This very much reads like the clash between someone who didn’t go to a North American oversexed high school versus someone who did. Your comment is littered with “People never did X activity” addressed to someone who did X activity. We’re just too different. Given the POV was also teenagered, I do not feel a wrongdoing and still feel okay doing what I do.

      I’d dedicate more energy to this but you said I don’t know shit about rapists when I used the times I was violated to write both BMS and GBM. That comment was unforgivably rude. If you wanted to talk to me or commission me, don’t make it within the next year please.

      Liked by 2 people

    3. Aya, Bashful’s audience came from website that real smut content who (probably loves) long descriptive sex scene. There are also readers who love Bashful’s content just for the plot, sure. But he’s writing for his main audience. Could he write minimal sex scene with good plot and still have people reading? Sure, but that may not be his primary audience.

      Personally, when I read BMS many years ago, it was mainly to get off (I’m one of the rare very disturbed people who enjoyed reading smut story to get off). But I also learned that having a lot of casual sex may not be all that nice after a point. If BMS didn’t have descriptive sex scene, I wouldn’t be interested in the story and I wouldn’t learn about consequences.

      This may sound like “i agree with Bashful’s POV wholeheartedly yada yada”. Maybe it is. But I also recognise what Bashful’s intent in all these.

      Liked by 1 person

    4. “I won’t visit this website ever again, so I don’t know if you’ll respond to this or not.”

      Sounds like the right decision, frankly. There’s no point visiting a site like this if you don’t want to read about sex, and find it ‘triggering’. Just like there’s not a lot of point watching detective TV if you don’t like learning about (fictional) crime or can’t stand the thought of violence.

      But your complaint has produced a very interesting response and defence from Bashful so not a total waste of time.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. And who knows, maybe one day I’ll ask for a commission piece and challenge you to write a non-erotic story just to prove to you it’s possible and your an amazing writer without all the sex stuff!

    If you ever need an insight or perspective about anything, you could always email me.

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  3. I think this is a nuanced topic that you’ve addressed well, I wouldn’t worry about naysayers. People that are comfortable in the knowledge that they’re not attracted to children won’t take issue with the age of the protagonists, it just establishes the world and motives of characters. I’d be horrified if someone my age (27) slept with any of the characters of Mutual Benefits too. Even though they’re legal, it is morally corrupt in my mind. Why is no one taking issue with that too? It’s the same premise.

    What makes me more uncomfortable are my own memories of the high-school years of my life. I have had sex with a 14 year old, and although I was 15 at the time, should I still look back on that memory erotically? I’m remembering mutually joyful, pleasurable and (most importantly) consensual sex, but I’m also visualising myself with a child. I don’t know how I feel about that.

    What I do know is that, for me, your stories are a healthy outlet for those kind of memories. It’s sad that some people degrade your work on the basis that it takes place at this certain point in someone’s life, but the alternative is to not have any media that is an accurate portrayal of what life is like at that age.

    The one thing I do agree with the commenter about is that you’d be an excellent non-erotic author if you chose to go down that path though. It wouldn’t be a ‘step-up’ – a lack of sex doesn’t somehow magically make literature more high brow. I disagree strongly with that snobbish sentiment. But it would be an interesting change

    Stay safe, I’m glad you’re doing ok otherwise

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